The Kitchener Bind-Off – a Tutorial

Recently, I wrote a post about the many different ways of joining crochet which got me thinking. How about joining knitting? Perhaps the most requests I have from more advanced students is to learn how to join and finish their work. So I thought I’d share a step-by-step guide on the Kitchener stitch.

The Kitchener stitch recreates the structure of each knitted stitch using a sewing needle. Since you have two legs on each stitch (one on either side of your knitting needle), with a sewing needle, you need to go through each stitch twice to recreate the stitch accurately. Other points to bear in mind are that you are joining two sets of live stitches – not bound off edges and that the number of stitches need to be equal on the two sides.

Step 1: Take two knitted fabrics

Take two knitted fabrics

Take two knitted fabrics

Place your live stitches on the same set of needles and place with the wrong sides together.

IMG_20140518_150003

Hold the fabrics with the wrong sides together

With the yarn on the right, thread the end through a large blunt needle. You are ready to go!

Step 2 – Kitchener away

Purlwise

Purlwise on Front needle

(a) Insert the needle purlwise through the first stitch on the Front needle. Leave the stitch on the needle.

Knitwise

Knitwise on Back needle

(b) Insert the needle knitwise through the first stitch on the Back needle. Leave the stitch on the needle.

First stitch off needle

The first stitch bound off

(c) Insert the needle knitwise through the first stitch on the Front needle and let it run off the needle. Your first stitch bound off.

purlwise into next stitch

Carry on

(d) Insert the needle purlwise through the next stitch on the Front needle. Leave it on the needle.

Second stitch off the needle

Second stitch off the needle

(e) Insert the needle purlwise in the stitch on the back needle and let it run off. The second stitch bound off. You now have a matching pair.

Repeat Steps 2(a) – (e) until you have one stitch left on the back needle. Insert the needle through this stitch purlwise and weave the ends in.

Finished

“Kitchenered”

Once you sort out the tension, this is a worthwhile stitch to have in our armoury of finishing off.

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About monsteryarns

I am a yarn enthusiast and knitter.
This entry was posted in Bind-off, Knitting, Techniques and tagged , , . Bookmark the permalink.

3 Responses to The Kitchener Bind-Off – a Tutorial

  1. sandeleh says:

    and once one understands the steps to making either a K st (knit, off; purl, on) or a P st (purl, off; K, on) it’s really easy to kitchener ribbing or garter st where the stitches change. Just do the motions on each needle that will create either the V or the Bump.

  2. Pingback: Dog Coat – a Quick Pattern |

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