Spring is for Flat Caps – a Pattern

Flat caps are known by many names: longshoreman’s cap, scally cap, Wigens cap, ivy cap, golf cap, driving cap, Jeff cap, in Scotland, bunnet, in New Zealand, cheese-cutter. The main thing is that they are for Spring! They give just the right coverage to protect against that North-Eastern cutting wind but don’t have the winter bulkiness – or pompoms. Plus, they seem to be really cool at the moment.

Flat Cap

You will need yarn which is quite firm and scrunchy feeling to make sure that the cap has good body and doesn’t flop. Use aran weight yarn – this pattern looks good in self-patterning yarn. The cap knits up easily – being made out of seven triangles sewn together to create, with a visor.

flat cap

Gauge 18 sts and 24 rows = 10 cms with 4.5 mm needles.

Triangles – make eight:
With 3.75mm needles cast on 13 stitches
In stocking stitch knit six rows.
Change to 4.5 mm needles.
Increase rows: k2, m1, (k3, m1) 3 times, k2. (17 stitches).
In stocking stitch knit 19 rows.
Next row: k1, k2tog, k11, ssk, k1. (15 stitches).
In stocking stitch knit 3 rows.
Next row: k1, k2tog, k9, ssk, k1. (13 stitches).
In stocking stitch knit 3 rows.
Next row: k1, k2tog, k7, ssk, k1. (11 stitches).
In stocking stitch knit 3 rows.
Next row: k1, k2tog, k5, ssk, k1. (9 stitches).
In stocking stitch knit 3 rows.
Next row: k1, k2tog, k3, ssk, k1. (7 stitches).
Purl 1 row.
Next row: k1, k2tog, k1, ssk, k1. (5 stitches).
Purl 1 row.
Next row: k1, slip 2, k1, pass slipped stitches over, k1. (3 stitches).
Next row: p3tog.

Cut yarn and draw through stitch.

When you have all seven triangles, sew together to form a circle. I sewed mine with the seams on the outside to create distinct ridges.

Upper Brim

Starting at seam and with 4.5mm needles, pick up and knit 33 stitches covering three sections.
Purl 1 row.
Next row: k2, kfb, (k1, kfb) 4 times, k11, kfb, (k1, kfb) 4 times, k2. (43 stitches)
Purl 1 row.
Next row: k1, ssk, k to last 3 stitches, k2tog, k1. (41 stitches)
Next row: p1, p2tog, p to last 3 stitches, ssp, p1. (39 stitches)
Next rows: decrease 2 stitches as set in the previous two rows until you have 25 stitches.

Bind off.

Make the bottom brim by casting on 33 stitches and working as above.

Sew second brim to the bottom of the top brim with knit stitches facing outside.

Work in all ends.

If the cap is too loose on your head, pick up and knit 33 stitches on three sections opposite from the brim. K2tog along the stitches. Try on to check the fit. Cast off when you have a good snug fit.

Flat cap

 

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About monsteryarns

I am a yarn enthusiast and knitter.
This entry was posted in Knitting, Patterns, Yarn and tagged , . Bookmark the permalink.

9 Responses to Spring is for Flat Caps – a Pattern

  1. Angela P Davis says:

    I’ve been looking for this exact pattern for 2 years!!!! A male friend of mine asked me if I could do one for him because his current hat is wearing out from use. He wears it summer. He wears it year round – in NYC.

  2. Diane says:

    how many skeins should i buy to make this hat and is sock yarn ok I can’t find the weight of aran yarn please help thank you Diane

  3. sandy says:

    Yes I would like to know, how many yards, as my husband’s head measures about 25″ around. thanks

    • monsteryarns says:

      Hello!
      I made this such a long time ago, I don’t recall exactly how many skeins of aran I used. I’d guesstimate about 3. So in yardage that would be about 300 yards. I would presumem that for a man’s cap, you’d need slightly more.

  4. Love it, knitted it. Thank you.

  5. Christine Fairbanks says:

    Is the flat cap done with 7 or 8 triangles? The pattern lists both, picture shows 7. Also, would you please use American needle sizing along with the metric?

    • monsteryarns says:

      Hi
      Sorry Christine, I’ve not been blogging for a while now so I’ve not been checking the comments.
      The needle size is US7.
      On whether you knit 7 or 8 segments, it’s sort of up to you and the look you’re after. Some people have knitted 8 which gives the cap a much fuller look. I decided to knit 7 as I wanted a tighter look.
      Hope that helps!

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